Friday, 1 February 2013

What do they see?

I often wonder what other people see when they see Sunny.

Do they see that he walks and runs unstable? Or do they see how happy he is when he can run around, chasing birds, just being the carefree little boy he is supposed to see? Do they hear him laugh giddy with pleasure?

Do they see his glasses and pity him because he has to wear them although he is still so small? Or do they see how his beautiful eyes marvel at all the big and small things around him? Do they see how he takes it all in, processing the information in his own unique way?

Do they see that he talks to me with gestures and do they hear the sounds he makes in order to communicate with me? Or do they see how much he has to tell the world and me and how he uses his whole body to get his point across? Do they see how happy he is when he is understood? When we both share a language that not many people around us understand.

Do they see that he has problems with eating and that he still has to be spoon-fed? Or do they see that he is lucky enough to eat by himself, not needing a g-tube or anything like that. Do they see that he can swallow on his own? Do they see how much he loves cake and ice cream, like any other little boy?

Do they see Sunny and notice immediately that he has special needs, superimposing everything else that is to be discovered about this child? Or do they just see him and feel immediately that he is such a special boy, full of love, gentle, kind, content, with an ever-sunny disposition?

Photo credits

Do they see a mom who needs to be pitied because of her son? Or do they see a mom who loves her life, who is happy and thankful and full of fierce love for her little son, the light of her life? Do they see that we have a special bond that has always been there and always will be there?

I often wonder what other people see when they see Sunny.


18 comments:

  1. Aw, Joy. What a beautifully written post. I see one wonderful mommy and her amazing little boy. And lots and lots of love.
    <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, dear sister of mine! xoxo

      Delete
  2. What hurts me most is when people see Silas' tube or hear him talk and assume he must be deaf, dumb, mute, blind and everything else. I can't tell you how many adults don't listen to him because they don't realize how smart he is, they just see a special needs kid. I kind of had a major issue when Silas got his first pair of glasses too wondering what people thought. It's hard not to always have that in the back of your mind,isn't it? Ironically,I find kids in general to be more likely to give Silas the benefit of the doubt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is really hurtful, Alana. And you are so right, it is hard to shake that off. xo

      Delete
  3. Beautiful, Joy. I hope they see a mother who loves her son and a boy who is amazing. There is a really wonderful campaign by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare (hospital that specializes in kids with disabilities) called CurePity. You'll relate, I'm sure. http://aintnorollercoaster.com/help-me-cure-pity/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Tatum! I will check that link out!

      Delete
  4. Lovely! I was a special needs teacher and I saw how the other teachers looked at my kids. I felt sorry for those teachers because they never got to see the beautiful gifts that each of my students possessed. I'm the lucky one! This post is a beautiful tribute to you and your child.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Rachel! And I just LOVE your attitude!

      Delete
  5. Through this post, I see all that you see and that you are a mom with a beautiful spirit! TALU

    ReplyDelete
  6. Those who can't see come to see with beautiful words like these!

    #TALU

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Rosey for your beautiful comment!

      Delete
  7. Although I was already conscious of these issues for other reasons, it really hit home when I fractured my leg as a kid. For liability purposes, the school didn't want me climbing the bus steps with a full cast and crutches, so I was forced to take the "short bus." I noticed immediately that I was being treated differently, and nothing about me had changed other than something attached to my leg temporarily. It really is an odd phenomenon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow Chris, I bet this was a strange experience for you! Thank you for your comment!

      Delete

I LOVE comments! Please talk to me! :-)